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R E Q U I E M  F O R  C O R A L S

 

 

 

SHORT PRESENTATION

“Requiem for corals” is an aesthetic and nocturnal journey into a macroscopic underwater world of corals at the moment of exposure to climate change impacts, where these tiny colourful and moving creatures live on the verge of dying. A visual and ethereal dance macabre of current times’ severe reality in a world beyond imagination and beyond our field of view. -Where calls and hope for a new future arise from the movement of a silent rebellion.

The project is a cinematic installation. An alternative visual dance piece, with dancing corals on video projections in a circular expressionistic scenery, which let the audience to be immersed into the macro-universe of corals.

The project is based on makro-shootings of corals and inspired by scientific climate research about coral life and existence – and how the ocean’s coral reefs are affected by global warming. The project is created in collaboration with Israeli coral scientist and underwater cinematographer Tom Schlesinger.

The project is work in progress.

 

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Excerpts of the footage. (6,5 min.)

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RESEARCH AND CORAL CASTING
Most people are familiar with corals from being huge colourful colonies of stony reef formations experienced from a distant diving perspective. Through my research, I have been looking at the life of corals through the macroscopic camera lens. By using the macro-optic, I have discovered a hidden world of life and movements, that the human eye cannot see.

By observing each species for hours in real time and getting into their slow rhythm of life, I discovered the reef in a way that goes beyond being a spectacular landscape of shapes and colours, but as a community of fascinating personas with unique individual behaviours. Each of them moving in its very own way with personal expressions, tempers – even moods. Their movements are their visual language.

When casting the corals, I’ve been searching for species whose movements mirror human behaviours, so that we can recognise ourselves in them through the way they act and move. I found the corals performing familiar archetypes through a set of universal human movements and activities. The casting revolves around a selection of species performing these different human movements and reacting to changes in their environment in the most visible and expressive way.